FSOC Adopts Rules for Determination of Systemically Important Non-Banks

May 17, 2012

by: Jerry Blanchard

The Financial Stability Oversight Council has adopted a final rule that went into effect on May 11, 2012 describing the framework that the Council intends to use to determine whether a non-bank financial company is systemically important to the US financial system and whose failure could pose a threat to the U.S. financial stability.  The consequences of being designated a systemically important company is that the Federal Reserve is given the authority to impose risk based capital requirements, leverage limits, liquidity requirements, resolution plans, concentration limits, a contingent capital requirement; enhanced public disclosures; short-term debt limits; and overall risk management requirements.

The Council adopted a three-stage process for making its determination. The first stage is designed to narrow the universe of non-bank financial companies by establishing certain size or other quantitative thresholds. The second stage applies the analytic framework (i) size, (ii) interconnectedness, (iii) substitutability, (iv) leverage, (v) liquidity

Read More